CLOUDUCATION

education, cloud computing, technology, social media, leadership.

Author Archive: clouducation

I, Parent

If you are both a parent and a teacher, you probably have noticed a certain discomfort as the deeply held philosophies and attitudes you hold as a parent sometimes clash with those you hold as a teacher. I think a lot about this, and I feel that more and more often my feelings in these …

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Common Core Testing Backlash – Beginning with principals…

I have grave concerns about the Common Core movement and the doors CCSS opens toward pushing a test-dominated, packaged-curricula world for our students. The initial promise of alignment and common sense standards has already evolved into a texting frenzy, as states and districts aim to prove the new reforms are bearing fruit. I offer a …

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EduCanon might just be the key to flipped accountability

A brilliant math teacher walked in to my room yesterday and said she thought she may have found the answer to her struggles with her flipped advanced math courses: knowing who viewed what, and for how long. She has been fully committed to the flipped concept for most of the past two years, but she …

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4 Reasons you should NOT flip your classroom

I have been long been in favor of the idea of exploiting the power of digital technology to help students learn. In fact, I have been a great proponent of the idea of the flipped classroom, so it may be odd that I am writing a post about why one should not implement the flipped …

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For these kids, YouTube is Google…

Ever really watched a kid look something up online? Have you noticed the same trend I have? That to most kids, YouTube is on the same par as Google when looking something up? For example, if I take students into a lab or check out iPads, and ask them to get some information about Elizabeth …

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Skype: the best way to connect students to the real world

Last week I used Skype* to bring some Shakespearean actors into my 9th grade classes to connect with our Romeo and Juliet unit. It was fantastic. The students loved it. The actors loved it. I loved it. So why don’t I do this more often? Really? I think that despite being a daily user of …

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If we are testing the right things, it’s hard to cheat.

A few years ago, my teaching of Romeo & Juliet changed. No, the play hadn’t changed, and the actual instruction was more or less the same. The only change is that I encourage cheating. A few years ago, it became clear to me that despite working on the language and the story in class, many …

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If you could only have three apps?

One of the most memorable parts of George Couros‘ presentation Leading Innovative Change is his discussion about restraining and refining what his district expected from teachers in terms of technology. At first, he explained, they had all sorts of applications being used, and he showed a few dozen familiar logos on screen. The problem with …

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Ten types of edTweeps you meet on Twitter #PLN

The Twitter PLN is without a doubt the greatest resource for educators at any level today. Whether one teaches kindergarten or graduate studies, there is a rich and powerful network of caring, generous education professionals sharing insight, materials, and support.  Here is a quick guide to some of the folks you will meet once you …

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Children, come blog with me!

This is the first year I have asked my ninth graders to blog. I have read and supported the idea for years, I just never felt like the technology infrastructure was quite ready for it. In the past we did shared Google Documents and occasionally posted to online sites such as figment.com, but our efforts …

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